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Content Oriented Web
Make great presentations, longreads, and landing pages, as well as photo stories, blogs, lookbooks, and all other kinds of content oriented projects.
Solo show at Osthaus Museum Hagen, Germany

Jul 31­­­–Oct 2, 2016
EVGENY CHUBAROV.
THE BERLIN WORKS
The works of Chubarov presented in the exhibition in Hagen can be divided into three categories: figurative compositions of the Soviet period; graphic works of the final years (2008–2012); and the monumental abstract works of the Berlin period (1991–1996).

Now it would be inappropriate to dwell on the details of the difficult conditions that progressive artists in the Soviet Union had to work under. Suffice it to say the following, the end of the avant-garde period in the first two decades of the twentieth century coincided with Joseph Stalin coming to power and, in 1934, with the adoption of socialist realism in literature, music and the fine arts at the state level. After Stalin's death, the Thaw period began and nonconformists began to arise, but this cost them a lack of public recognition. Government contracts continued to be divided amongst the official artists, which ensured their survival, and the "unofficial" artists had to eke out a miserable existence and seek income on the side.

The fifty monumental works (1991–1996) presented in Hagen, represent an important milestone not only in Chubarov's works, but also in contemporary Russian art. These outstanding works of painting and graphic art have a specific provenance, they are not representational, they are self-referential.
Solo show at Osthaus Museum Hagen, Germany

Jul 31­­­–Oct 2, 2016
EVGENY CHUBAROV.
THE BERLIN WORKS

The works of Chubarov presented in the exhibition in Hagen can be divided into three categories: figurative compositions of the Soviet period; graphic works of the final years (2008–2012); and the monumental abstract works of the Berlin period (1991–1996).

Now it would be inappropriate to dwell on the details of the difficult conditions that progressive artists in the Soviet Union had to work under. Suffice it to say the following, the end of the avant-garde period in the first two decades of the twentieth century coincided with Joseph Stalin coming to power and, in 1934, with the adoption of socialist realism in literature, music and the fine arts at the state level. After Stalin's death, the Thaw period began and nonconformists began to arise, but this cost them a lack of public recognition. Government contracts continued to be divided amongst the official artists, which ensured their survival, and the "unofficial" artists had to eke out a miserable existence and seek income on the side.

The fifty monumental works (1991–1996) presented in Hagen, represent an important milestone not only in Chubarov's works, but also in contemporary Russian art. These outstanding works of painting and graphic art have a specific provenance, they are not representational, they are self-referential.
The early figurative works unquestionably pay tribute to the outstanding symbolist and teacher of analytical art, Pavel Filonov, who was one of the pillars of the avant-garde. On Filonov's canvases, usually there would be many figures all gathered in a very narrow space, as if the characters materialized out of nature and suddenly gained shape. In contrast to Filonov's works, Chubarov's paintings are clearer in their macrostructure. They are characterized by strong, often aggressive, multi-figure compositions. Very often naked bodies can be found facing each other in multi-figure scenes in such a way that they seem to compete for the space on the canvas. These works are so imbued with the spirit of struggle that sometimes there is a sense of a heated conflict between the sexes. That said, this violent convergence is also marked by an erotic element. This environment is defined not only by nudity, but also by the aggressive and strong-willed poses of the figures. This, in the words of Hans Hofmann, is a good "push" and "pull" relationship: an action of force and its subsequent expression determine the mood of these paintings.
The early figurative works unquestionably pay tribute to the outstanding symbolist and teacher of analytical art, Pavel Filonov, who was one of the pillars of the avant-garde. On Filonov's canvases, usually there would be many figures all gathered in a very narrow space, as if the characters materialized out of nature and suddenly gained shape. In contrast to Filonov's works, Chubarov's paintings are clearer in their macrostructure. They are characterized by strong, often aggressive, multi-figure compositions. Very often naked bodies can be found facing each other in multi-figure scenes in such a way that they seem to compete for the space on the canvas. These works are so imbued with the spirit of struggle that sometimes there is a sense of a heated conflict between the sexes. That said, this violent convergence is also marked by an erotic element. This environment is defined not only by nudity, but also by the aggressive and strong-willed poses of the figures. This, in the words of Hans Hofmann, is a good "push" and "pull" relationship: an action of force and its subsequent expression determine the mood of these paintings.
Evgeny Chubarov's monumental, large-format (3 × 2 m and larger) canvases shows that, figuratively speaking, we are dealing with symphonic works. Chubarov's canvases of the Berlin period represent "non-relational art". This means that the composition is randomly scattered across the canvas. This arbitrary composition eliminates the internal balance of colors, shapes, and strokes. The expressive power of these works is huge and the effect they have on a space and on the audience is very impressive. Their size suggests that these works are part of a larger context and are more likely intended to be in a museum rather than a private collection.

Evgeny Chubarov's monumental, large-format (3 × 2 m and larger) canvases shows that, figuratively speaking, we are dealing with symphonic works. Chubarov's canvases of the Berlin period represent "non-relational art". This means that the composition is randomly scattered across the canvas. This arbitrary composition eliminates the internal balance of colors, shapes, and strokes. The expressive power of these works is huge and the effect they have on a space and on the audience is very impressive. Their size suggests that these works are part of a larger context and are more likely intended to be in a museum rather than a private collection.
We are familiar with the principle of a composition scattered all over the canvas thanks to Jackson Pollock. But, while Pollock's paintings arose as a fragment of a larger context (his canvases were cut from a larger canvas lying on the floor), Chubarov always painted his works in a set scale, for example 3 × 2 meters. The artist turned to a specific format and worked within this format with all the freedom of the painting process. As far as we know, Chubarov's work was not done on the floor. He leaned his canvases against the wall or hung them up to paint on them. We also do not see him using splashing or dripping paint techniques, as Pollock preferred.

The technique of applying paint with a squeegee is observed both in black-and-white and color paintings. Colorful shapes, in red, green, yellow, black, or white paint, are applied to the lower thin layers of black brushstrokes, in such a way that they resemble handkerchiefs waving in the wind, although that is not what is depicted. The color paintings are characterized by a lightness that differs them from most of the black-and-white ones.
We are familiar with the principle of a composition scattered all over the canvas thanks to Jackson Pollock. But, while Pollock's paintings arose as a fragment of a larger context (his canvases were cut from a larger canvas lying on the floor), Chubarov always painted his works in a set scale, for example 3 × 2 meters. The artist turned to a specific format and worked within this format with all the freedom of the painting process. As far as we know, Chubarov's work was not done on the floor. He leaned his canvases against the wall or hung them up to paint on them. We also do not see him using splashing or dripping paint techniques, as Pollock preferred.

The technique of applying paint with a squeegee is observed both in black-and-white and color paintings. Colorful shapes, in red, green, yellow, black, or white paint, are applied to the lower thin layers of black brushstrokes, in such a way that they resemble handkerchiefs waving in the wind, although that is not what is depicted. The color paintings are characterized by a lightness that differs them from most of the black-and-white ones.
Chubarov's paintings are dominated by lines. His works are covered in several layers of lineal ornamentation, while both micro- and macrostructures interpenetrate in the painting process. The work on a piece is carried out in stages, rather than all at once. It is clear that Chubarov had a brilliant inner guiding force in turning his ideas into works of art. Sometimes rounded lines extend from one edge of the painting to the other, that are then replaced by stronger thicker patterns of lines that wrap around the first layer. Then thin rectangular, square or triangular colorful and black blotches are added, arranged in a row. We can also see traces of a squeegee, which was often used to apply a few final layers of paint on top of the previous layers of lineal ornamentation. Nothing is weighed in this limitless freedom. This is where Chubarov performs masterfully.
Chubarov's paintings are dominated by lines. His works are covered in several layers of lineal ornamentation, while both micro- and macrostructures interpenetrate in the painting process. The work on a piece is carried out in stages, rather than all at once. It is clear that Chubarov had a brilliant inner guiding force in turning his ideas into works of art. Sometimes rounded lines extend from one edge of the painting to the other, that are then replaced by stronger thicker patterns of lines that wrap around the first layer. Then thin rectangular, square or triangular colorful and black blotches are added, arranged in a row. We can also see traces of a squeegee, which was often used to apply a few final layers of paint on top of the previous layers of lineal ornamentation. Nothing is weighed in this limitless freedom. This is where Chubarov performs masterfully.
The exhibition includes works in ink, made in more recent years, which reveal a new facet of Chubarov's creativity, composed with a charming Dionysian attitude. He did not address specific characters, only anonymous figures involved in wild merrymaking. In these provocative paintings, we find primal forms of human life. Do these pictures reflect the aspirations of the artist? In his final years, did he dream, like Picasso, of a turbulent world surrounded by a multitude of men and women? In the final years of Picasso's work, there were more and more violent scenes. His series dedicated to artists and art models are the best evidence of his resistance to advancing infirmity. Chubarov's works in ink really get to the point. They demonstrate a rampage, a drama that overcomes the dominance of the world, in a way that may seem surrealistic. Nevertheless, we find a lot of truth in these works, when we try to pass them off as our own fantasies.
The exhibition includes works in ink, made in more recent years, which reveal a new facet of Chubarov's creativity, composed with a charming Dionysian attitude. He did not address specific characters, only anonymous figures involved in wild merrymaking. In these provocative paintings, we find primal forms of human life. Do these pictures reflect the aspirations of the artist? In his final years, did he dream, like Picasso, of a turbulent world surrounded by a multitude of men and women? In the final years of Picasso's work, there were more and more violent scenes. His series dedicated to artists and art models are the best evidence of his resistance to advancing infirmity. Chubarov's works in ink really get to the point. They demonstrate a rampage, a drama that overcomes the dominance of the world, in a way that may seem surrealistic. Nevertheless, we find a lot of truth in these works, when we try to pass them off as our own fantasies.
In his works, Chubarov achieves an internationalism, which in terms of both its conceptual scope and formal embodiment deserves the highest recognition. Here we are dealing with an artist who, at the age of 62, is not only becoming acquainted with the West and its art, but in a short period of time in a state of enrapturement creates works that open up new dimensions of contemplation.


Dr. Tayfun Belgin,
Director of Osthaus Museum Hagen
In his works, Chubarov achieves an internationalism, which in terms of both its conceptual scope and formal embodiment deserves the highest recognition. Here we are dealing with an artist who, at the age of 62, is not only becoming acquainted with the West and its art, but in a short period of time in a state of enrapturement creates works that open up new dimensions of contemplation.


Dr. Tayfun Belgin,
Director of Osthaus Museum Hagen