Content Oriented Web
Make great presentations, longreads, and landing pages, as well as photo stories, blogs, lookbooks, and all other kinds of content oriented projects.
Content Oriented Web
Make great presentations, longreads, and landing pages, as well as photo stories, blogs, lookbooks, and all other kinds of content oriented projects.
Untitled, 1982
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Untitled, 1981
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Untitled, 1980
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Untitled, 1979
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Untitled, 1974
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Untitled, 1970
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Untitled, 1969
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Untitled, 1969
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Untitled, 1969
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Untitled, 1968
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Untitled, 1967
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Untitled, 1965
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Untitled, 1962
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Left
Right
EARLY FIGURATIVE PAINTINGS
Chubarov's figurative paintings are characterized by strong, often aggressive, multi-figure compositions, with the exception of scenes of rural life that he only painted from time to time. Very often naked bodies can be found facing each other in multi-figure scenes in such a way that they seem to compete for the space on the canvas. These works are so imbued with the spirit of struggle that sometimes there is a sense of a heated conflict between the sexes. That said, this violent convergence is also marked by an erotic element. This environment is defined not only by nudity, but also by the aggressive and strong-willed poses of the figures. This, in the words of Hans Hofmann, is a good "push" and "pull" relationship: an action of force and its subsequent expression determine the mood of these paintings. All of this is a game of bodies that is similarly reflected in the ink works of the last period.

The 1976 "Untitled" work, two naked figures, full of strength, are embraced in the very limited space of the painting. Chubarov divided the canvas into four parts with a cross: he placed a man to the left and a woman to the right. In an exercise of strength, the naked man is trying to raise his leg, which bears against the boundary of the space. The nude woman with huge breasts and powerful thighs is looking at us, the audience, with her arms crossed behind her head and a surly expression on her face, as if she wants to ask what the purpose of all this torture is. In this symbolic painting, the man and the woman in the crosshairs of the canvas are separated from each other, as if they are in different prison cells.
Chubarov's figurative paintings are characterized by strong, often aggressive, multi-figure compositions, with the exception of scenes of rural life that he only painted from time to time. Very often naked bodies can be found facing each other in multi-figure scenes in such a way that they seem to compete for the space on the canvas. These works are so imbued with the spirit of struggle that sometimes there is a sense of a heated conflict between the sexes. That said, this violent convergence is also marked by an erotic element. This environment is defined not only by nudity, but also by the aggressive and strong-willed poses of the figures. This, in the words of Hans Hofmann, is a good "push" and "pull" relationship: an action of force and its subsequent expression determine the mood of these paintings. All of this is a game of bodies that is similarly reflected in the ink works of the last period.

The 1976 "Untitled" work, two naked figures, full of strength, are embraced in the very limited space of the painting. Chubarov divided the canvas into four parts with a cross: he placed a man to the left and a woman to the right. In an exercise of strength, the naked man is trying to raise his leg, which bears against the boundary of the space. The nude woman with huge breasts and powerful thighs is looking at us, the audience, with her arms crossed behind her head and a surly expression on her face, as if she wants to ask what the purpose of all this torture is. In this symbolic painting, the man and the woman in the crosshairs of the canvas are separated from each other, as if they are in different prison cells.